Tuesday, 2 April 2013

Product Spotlight: Distress Ink Pads - Part 1


Hola!

Good Morning ladies..

This entire month we will be featuring Distress Ink pads & Distress stains and all we know about them.. from the different ways to use them and also storage ideas.. So do stay tuned to this blog. Also, if you have any queries or doubts on anything related to distress ink.. then just drop a line below in the comments and we will get back to you as soon as possible. :)

What are Distress Ink pads?

Distress ink pads are 'acid-free, non-toxic, fade resistance, water based dye inks'. They come in 48 different colors.

12 New Shades


TIM34995
Picked
Raspberry
NEW!
TIM32861
Festive
Berries
NEW!
TIM32830
Ripe
Persimmon
NEW!
TIM34940
Squeezed
Lemonade
NEW!
TIM32878
Iced
Spruce
NEW!
TIM35008
Mowed
Lawn
NEW!
TIM32854
Evergreen
Bough
NEW!
TIM35015
Salty
Ocean
NEW!
TIM34933
Peacock
Feathers
NEW!
TIM34957
Shaded
Lilac
NEW!
TIM32847
Seedless
Preserves
NEW!
TIM32823
Gathered
Twigs
NEW!
36 Original Shades 
TIM27096
Barn
Door
TIM27102
Bundled
Sage
TIM27119
Chipped
Sapphire
TIM27126
Crushed
Olive
TIM27133
Forest
Moss
TIM27140
Pumice
Stone
TIM21452
Faded
Jeans
TIM21421
Brushed
Corduroy
TIM21407
Aged
Mahogany
TIM21445
Dusty
Concord
TIM21506
Spiced
Marmalade
TIM21476
Pine
Needles
TIM19534
Walnut
Stain
TIM19497
Antique
Linen
TIM19510
Tea
Dye
TIM19527
Vintage
Photo
TIM19541
Black
Soot
TIM19503
Old
Paper
TIM27157
Rusty
Hinge
TIM27164
Spun
Sugar
TIM27171
Stormy
Sky
TIM27188
Tumbled
Glass
TIM27195
Victorian
Velvet
TIM27201
Wild
Honey
TIM21414
Broken
China
TIM21469
Frayed
Burlap
TIM21513
Worn
Lipstick
TIM21483
Scattered
Straw
TIM21438
Dried
Marigold
TIM21490
Shabby
Shutters
TIM20219
Milled
Lavender
TIM20333
Peeled
Paint
TIM20240
Tattered
Rose
TIM20226
Mustard
Seed
TIM20257
Weathered
Wood
TIM20202
Fired
Brick
Image Source: rangerink.com

These are some of the colors I own.. and I cant wait to add all the remaining colors into my collection.. :)

As you can see.. they come in raised 2 x 2 sized pads.

These ink pads have some special properties which makes them dry slow.. because of which it can can be easily blended.

Example 1: I have a die cut pattern paper here and two distress ink pads. Distress inks are best used with the Ranger Foam Ink Blending Tool & Inessentials Non-Stick Craft Sheet.


Dab the Blending tool into the Distress ink Pad and start with touching next to the paper and then start rotating. Slowly work the tool onto the paper and keep rotating. This ensures smooth coverage.


Since distress inks dry slow it can be washed or spritzed with water.. which gives a very pretty aged and distressed look to your cardstock or pattern paper.

Example 2:
I have two distress inks, Hero Arts layering paper and some water in a spray bottle.


Swatch the inks pads onto your Craft Sheet and spritz some water on it. You may use two or more colors for this technique..


Randomly dab the paper onto the ink on the craft sheet. I went ahead and repeated the step couple of times to get my desired result. Now, use a heat tool to dry your card stock.


You may use it as itself directly on to your projects... But what I did was use a background stamp on it which made it look even more prettier.


Most inks may bleed slightly when in contact with water, but Distress Inks are designed to react with water.. which gives stunning results.

Example: 3
I stamped some butterfly images on to a water color card stock.


Dab some distress ink colors of your choice on to the craft sheet and use a water color brush to color the images


On the third butterfly I've used two shades of blue.. on the second butterfly I've used yellow and blue.. as for the first butterfly I've mixed three different colors.


Which did you like the most?! :) I love the one with red in it..


Example 4:
This example is a reverse of the second technique. This is called the Water Splotching technique.


For this, you need to blend inks on to the cardstock like explained in the first example..


Either spray or flick some water on to the distressed paper.. which will give your card stock a very pretty splotchy effect.


These are just a few examples of what you can do with Distress Ink pads.. For more ideas and tips stay tuned to this blog. :)

I went ahead and put all the distressed cardstock together to make a card.. and here is what I came up with!




                                                                                                     
Until next time..

Love,
Shruti

Supplies used:
Distress Inks
Hero Hues Eggshell Layering Paper
Hero Arts Lotus Background Cling Stamp
Inkessential Non-stick Craft Sheet
Ranger Heat It Craft Tool
Dear Lizzy Glitter Thickers

11 comments:

  1. so beautiful and bright card,thanks for sharing.

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  2. Beautiful!! The colors have blended perfectly!

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  3. What a fabulous tutorial Shruti ...your distress ink collection just made my jaw's drop!! .. I know how versatile these inks are so and I am definitely adding more to mm collection as well ...your card looks just gorgeous!!1 ..loved the way you have explained the techniques !!

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  4. Great post Shruti! And loved how all the bits and pieces came together as a beautiful card :)

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  5. Great distress ink collection...Love ur card and so the tute :)

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  6. gorgeous! love the card! thanks for sharing!

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  7. I've been wondering for so long what on earth distress inks are ... this has answered all my queries very well. Kudos!

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  8. Thank you, ladies! :) Glad you found the post useful..

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  9. Wow, I own almost 12 distress ink pads, and I have never put them into use like this before.

    TFS. The tutorial was very useful :)

    Regards,
    Vithya

    ReplyDelete
  10. wow...beautiful use of distress inks....amazing project....awesome

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  11. mY DREAM OF MAKING ONE CAME TRUE WHEN I SAW YOUR BLOG , YOU HAVE EXPLAINED THINGS SO WELL.i WAS JUST WONDERING HOW IT WORKS , MANY THANKS FOR SHARING. WHERE CAN I BUY THESE ? KINDLY MAIL ME THE ADDRESS. THANKS Email.....lalitatiny@gmail.com

    ReplyDelete

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